NAVIGATION

National Autism Center Publishes Autism Manual for Parents

12/12/11

Randolph, Mass. – Parents and caregivers everywhere are eager for credible, research-based information on the most effective treatments for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).

To address this need, the National Autism Center has released its newest manual, “A Parent’s Guide to Evidence-Based Practice and Autism.” The Center is a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting effective, evidence-based treatment approaches for individuals with ASD.

The 134-page manual focuses on helping parents as they make decisions about how to best help children with ASD reach their full potential. It begins with a review of the autism spectrum, symptoms, and co-occurring conditions, and identifies and describes effective treatments. Other topics include the importance of professional judgment, the role of family preferences and values in the decision-making process, and factors to consider when choosing a team of professionals to help their child.

“Finding information about autism is easy. It is much more difficult to find reliable information that has withstood the rigors of science, is comprehensive in scope, and is accessible and easy to read,” says Hanna C. Rue, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Director of Evidence-based Practice for the National Autism Center and one of the manual’s authors. “Even for a trained professional, sorting through the clutter to find information that is most relevant to a child’s needs is a complicated and challenging process.”

One of the features that make this manual different from most others is that it was co-authored by professionals and parents of children with autism. “As professionals, we think about treatment from an entirely different perspective than a parent,” Dr. Rue continues. “We felt it was critical that the parent experience be reflected in every aspect of the manual.”

“To have a trusted resource that you can go to for reliable information, or to check your own gut instinct, is essential for any parent of a child with autism,” explains Janet Amorello, one of the manual’s parent experts. “My hope is that this manual will help families assess the options and obtain services that ultimately result in a better outcome for their child.”

The manual is the latest in a series of publications by the National Autism Center. Visit the Center’s website to download a free copy, watch a video, or learn more.

About the National Autism Center
The National Autism Center is May Institute’s Center for the Promotion of Evidence-based Practice. It is dedicated to serving children and adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) by providing reliable information, promoting best practices, and offering comprehensive resources for families, practitioners, and communities.

An advocate for evidence-based treatment approaches, the National Autism Center identifies effective programming and shares practical information with families about how to respond to the challenges they face. The Center also conducts applied research and develops training and service models for practitioners. Finally, the Center works to shape public policy concerning ASD and its treatment through the development and dissemination of national standards of practice.

For more information, please call 877.313.3833 or visit www.nationalautismcenter.org

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